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Stanley, Ernest _.jpg Stancliff, Leo  Thumbnails1945 Santo Tomas - Ernest Stanley witnessStancliff, Leo  Thumbnails1945 Santo Tomas - Ernest Stanley witnessStancliff, Leo  Thumbnails1945 Santo Tomas - Ernest Stanley witness

Newspaper article about Ernest Stanley and his role in saving the hostages when Santo Tomas was liberated.

Ernest Stanley was born in England in 1901 and entered
the work by 1924 at the latest, perhaps earlier.
His name appears on early workers lists in England, California
and Japan. He went to Japan a few years before the war and evidently
was quite fluent in Japanese by the time the war broke out.

In June, 1941, the workers left Japan and went to the Philippines.
He was one of the workers interned at Santo Tomas and until the war
ended, he was made an interpreter because of his fluency in Japanese.

This New York Times article is about his testimony
regarding Japanese war crimes and an atrocity that he witnessed.

After the war he continued in the work in Japan for a few years,
at least until 1948. He married a Japanese lady, adopted a son
and lived in Tokyo the rest of his life.

Their home seemed to be the center of activities for the work
in Japan until his death in Tokyo in 1990.
He was credited with being very helpful to the American civilian
internees during the Los Banos, Philippines interment.
He appears in Clio Mathews Wetmore's book entitled "Beyond Pearl
Harbor" (1998) as one of the unsung heroes of Santo Tomas.

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